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Sabre Norris becomes a brand ambassador

Sabre Norris becomes a brand ambassador All Smiles: Sabre Norris at the Bowl-A-Rama skateboard competition in February. She aims to skate at the Olympics. Picture: Katherine Griffiths
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Sabre Norris at the Bowl-A-Rama skateboard competition in February. Picture: Katherine Griffiths

Sabre Norris at the Bowl-A-Rama skateboard competition in February. Picture: Katherine Griffiths

Sabre Norris at the Bowl-A-Rama skateboard competition in February. Picture: Katherine Griffiths

Sabre Norris at the Bowl-A-Rama skateboard competition in February. Picture: Katherine Griffiths

Sabre Norris at the Bowl-A-Rama skateboard competition in February. Picture: Katherine Griffiths

Sabre Norris at the Bowl-A-Rama skateboard competition in February. Picture: Katherine Griffiths

Sabre Norris at the Bowl-A-Rama skateboard competition in February. Picture: Katherine Griffiths

Sabre Norris at the Bowl-A-Rama skateboard competition in February. Picture: Katherine Griffiths

Sabre Norris at the Bowl-A-Rama skateboard competition in February. Picture: Katherine Griffiths

Sabre Norris and Tony Hawk.

Sabre Norris on The Ellen Show.

Sabre Norris.

Bigge, Naz, Sockie and Sabre Norris.

Sabre takes on trolls.

Biggie, Sabre and Sockie.

Sabre Norris surfing.

TweetFacebookShe’s bubbly, brightand marketable.

So it can’t come as a complete surprise that Newcastle’s Sabre Norris has become a brand ambassador at age 13.

She’s long been known as a skilled skateboarder and talented surfer.

But her talents extend beyond boardriding.

Videos on her YouTube channel, Sabre Norris and the Norris Nuts, can attract more than a million hits.

They detail the capers of Sabre and her three siblings, brother Biggy and sisters Sockie and Naz.

It’s these things, along with her confidence at handling media interviews, that attracted the attention of sponsors.

On Sunday, though, she’ll put media and commercial commitments to one side to focus solely on competing in a female open skateboarding competition at Five Dock Skatepark in Sydney.

“It’s the biggest comp in skateboarding at the moment,” Sabre said, of the Vans Park Series Oceania Continental Championships.

At the event, she’ll be attempting to qualify for the World Championshipsin Chinain October.

This would be another big step towards reaching her dream of competing at the Tokyo Olympics in 2020. She has been making progress.

In February, she won the female event at Bowl-A-Rama in Bondi, beating girls aged 19, 17 and 23.

“I like to go well in the comps because I like to win, but it’s always good when you’re having fun,” she said.

Usually, she’s “just skating with my brothers and sisters”.

“That’s kind of all that matters,” she said.

This kid may have her feet on the ground, but she’s also known for her sense of humour.

She became a household name after joking on The Today Show in 2016 that her dad, Olympic swimmer and bronze medalist Justin Norris, had a taste for ice cream and “had to suck his gut in for photos”.

Karl Stefanovic was in stitches. Before she knew it, she was whisked off to the US to appear on The Ellen Show.

She stirred her dad up again on the talk show, telling Ellen DeGeneres that “swimming sucks”.

“It’s just really boring, you just watch a line, it’s like … not fun,” she said.

Sabre’s rise in the sport and media worlds has inevitably led to commercial opportunities.

Skateboarding is renowned for its sponsorships. A skateboarder with a sponsor is a skateboarder with credibility.

But Sabre’s recent moves suggest she may be selective with her choices in the commercial arena.

Sheshowedshe hada social conscience when she appeared in a recent anti-bullying campaign on Channel 10’s The Project.

“To be honest there are twoSabres –a computer one where people think I’m popular, then the other real-life one which is the opposite of popular,” Sabre wrote on Instagram at the time.

“The place I fit in the least is at the skate park and the surf, which hurts because this is the place I want to fit in the most.”

Then earlier this week, she joined with Specsavers to promote the value of children getting their eyes tested.

With Sabre and her sisters all needing glasses, it seemed like a good fit.

“Children don’t know their eyesight is suffering and because it can be something that’s not physical or painful, it’s hard for us as parents to see it too,” Sabre’s mum, Brooke Norris said.

Sabre added: “I didn’t even know there was a problem with my eyes until I tried on Sockie’s glasses and everything looked so much better.”

Good vision is, of course, important for education and sport.

Good vision of another kind will also be needed as Sabre navigates the world of top-level sport,mass media and endorsements.

Just like when she surfs, she’ll be around friendlydolphins – but also the odd shark.

But this brave and smart girl is no stranger to challenges.

As reported in January, she was diagnosed with the condition Chiari malformation, which causes her brain tissue to extend into her spinal canal.

It’s thought that her condition may be affecting her pituitary gland because she hasn’t been growing.

“I’ve been OK, but I’ve got to get an MRI scan every six months to see if it’s getting worse or staying the same,” she said.

In the meantime, she’s “trying to be a good person”.

She’s also trying hard not to let herself get carried away with negative thoughts.

“That’s my plan,” she said.

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