. .

Posts by: admin

Comments Off on A-League: Jets defender shoots for a slice of history

A-League: Jets defender shoots for a slice of history

A-League: Jets defender shoots for a slice of history

CONFIDENT: Daniel Georgievski could sense early that the Newcastle Jets had the ingredients for a successful campaign despite the club’s doubters. Picture: Darren Pateman (AAP)DANIEL Georgievski likes to delveinto a city’s history. Listentostories. Discoverhow itfunctions. Its hearbeat. Its soul.
Nanjing Night Net

The Jets defender and his soon-to-be wife, Emily, are journeying toHavana, Cuba, for their honeymoon in July“to experience the culture and see its transformation from communism”.

They, in his words, “love that stuff”.

READ MORE:Lawrie McKinna’s message – Season to cherish, and more to play for

Before signing with the Jets, Georgievski, who spent a large slice of his career in Croatia and Romania, explored the history of Newcastle.

He was subsequently lured by the changing face of the city, the beach culture and proud football heritage.

“I love a city that has a story,” the 30-year-old Macedonian international said.

CROWD FAVOURITE: Daniel Georgievski celebrates with the Newcastle faithful. Picture: Darren Pateman (AAP)

On Friday, Georgievski and his Jets teammates hope to add another chapter to Newcastle’ssporting folklore.

The Jets host the A-League’s youngest–and richest–club Melbourne City at what is certain tobe a heaving McDonald Jones Stadium.

At stake is a place in the grand final, and for the Jets a shot a second championship, a decade on from the club’s lone title.

That win–agripping1-0 triumph over the Mariners at Allianz Stadium on February 24, 2008–was the day a region with arich football tapestry finally had the chance to beat its chest.

READ MORE:‘Blow-in’ Nikolai out to deliver ultimate goal to adopted city

“Growing up, I had travelled to Newcastle a few times with my cousins and absolutely loved it,” Georgievski said.“I knew a little bit about the history of the cityand its close ties to BHP. My fiancee also loves looking into the heritage of a city and once we looked further into Newcastle, it was quite interesting.I didn’t know much about the A-League until I moved back to Australia. I knew the Jets had won it before. We weremore interestedinthe city and how it went frombeing a BHP town–a coal-mining town–into a proper city.”

The biggest attraction for Georgievski was“how beautiful the beaches are”.

Though intoxicatedby the laid back coastallifestyle, a dream for a kid fromBlacktown in Sydney’s west, Georgievski was given some matter-of-fact advice from respected journalist,authorand Newcastle footballaficionado, Neil Jameson.

“He told me that it was a beautiful city but not to fall into the same trap as players in the past,” Georgievski said.“Life is like a holiday here, but don’t make your football like a holiday. That was the perfect advice.We live in one of the best spots in Newcastle and I’m really grateful that I get to wake up and listen to the ocean everyday.As a player you are not here on a holiday, you are here to entertain.”

A-League: Jets defender shoots for a slice of history TweetFacebookI love a city that has a story.

– Daniel Georgievski

Comments Off on SA Anzac service: women need recognition

SA Anzac service: women need recognition

SA Anzac service: women need recognition

Federal MP Simon Birmingham and SA Premier Steven Marshall joined crowds at the Anzac dawn service.Norman Curley often said if he had been an inch taller, he would never have made it home from war.
Nanjing Night Net

At Adelaide’s Anzac Day dawn service, his grandchildren, Garry Munro and Julie Moffat, clutched his framed picture and proudly told of his wartime heroics.

“He brought a helmet home with a bullet hole in it, and I used to ask him (about it) when I was young,” Mr Munro told AAP following the commemoration.

“He said ‘I was not tall for a reason… if I was any bigger, I probably wouldn’t have survived the war’.”

Ms Moffat travelled to Adelaide from Sydney especially for the service, and said her grandfather served in both World Wars before returning home to Australia.

Wearing Mr Curley’s rings, she said he had lied about his age to enlist to serve at just 15 years old.

As the sun rose, Ms Moffat joined thousands gathered at the South Australian National War Memorial and spilling down North Terrace, for the annual dawn service to mark Australia’s national day of remembrance.

Ian Smith, chair of the RSL SA’s Anzac Day committee, said more work needs to be done to recognise the service of women in the armed forces.

Women were restricted to nursing roles prior to World War II, when all three services introduced women’s branches.

“Women were fully integrated during the 1970s and 80s, and since then have continued to make their mark with a full range of responsibilities across all three services,” he told the crowd.

Mr Smith said 2018 marked the centenary of the end of the First World War, and Australian involvement in stopping the German spring offensive and in supporting the allied 100 offensive that drove the Germans back.

It also marks the 75th anniversary of many World War II battles and events, including the last Japanese air raid on Darwin, and the 50th anniversary of the 1968 Tet Offensive during the Vietnam War.

“Today we remember the service and sacrifices of all Australians who have served our nation in wars and conflicts since Federation,” Mr Smith said.

“In the last resort, they are the ones we have relied upon to protect us and our democratic freedoms.”

As the Last Post was played an elderly digger in the front row of the service collapsed before two minutes of silence was held.

Paramedics were quickly on the scene and reported he was “fine” as he was taken away.

The service, attended by dignitaries, politicians and representatives of various groups, began with the arrival of governor Hieu Van Le and the catafalque party.

Among those who laid wreaths were federal politicians Simon Birmingham and Penny Wong, Premier Steven Marshall, Opposition Leader Peter Malinauskas and Lord Mayor Martin Haese.

The service, which last about 50 minutes, concluded with the national anthems of Australia and New Zealand.

Australian Associated Press

Comments Off on Turnbull disappointed US envoy redirected

Turnbull disappointed US envoy redirected

Turnbull disappointed US envoy redirected

The US has changed its mind on making Admiral Harry Harris its Australian ambassador.Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull says he is disappointed Harry Harris will not be the next US ambassador to Australia, but understands why the experienced admiral is being redirected to South Korea.
Nanjing Night Net

Mr Turnbull has not spoken to US President Donald Trump since learning of the decision earlier this week, but insists he is unperturbed.

“I’m disappointed that Harry’s not coming because he’s a really good friend and I think Harry will be disappointed that he’s not coming to Canberra too because he loves Australia,” he told reporters in France.

“He is a guy of enormous experience and ability and given the situation on the Korean Peninsula, given the tensions there, I can well understand why the president has decided that the admiral’s expertise and experience is going to be able to be put to better use in Korea than in Australia.”

Mr Turnbull praised the “fantastic job” being done by acting US ambassador Jim Caruso.

“The relationship between Australia and the United States, as you all know as well as I do, that is so deep and so intense and operates at so many levels, the absence, if you like, of an ambassador is not really troubling the very strong relationship we have whatsoever,” Mr Turnbull said.

Earlier on Wednesday, Foreign Minister Julie Bishop confirmed Admiral Harris would not be heading to Canberra after being notified by acting US Secretary of State John Sullivan.

Ms Bishop said Mr Sullivan made it clear a new appointment to Canberra would be a priority for the next secretary of state.

“Based on the assumption he is confirmed by the Senate this week I hope to have a conversation with Mike Pompeo as soon as possible,” she said.

The full-time Canberra post has been vacant since September 2016, with Charge d’Affaires Mr Caruso acting in the role.

Former coalition deputy prime minister and diplomat Tim Fischer described one year without a US ambassador as an “accident” reflecting its low priority in Washington.

“Nigh on two years will be an insult with impact, notwithstanding the good work of the acting ambassador in Canberra,” he told AAP.

Labor foreign affairs spokeswoman Penny Wong said she recognised how important the South Korea post was to regional security given the risk presented by North Korea.

“It is disappointing that despite the close ties between our two countries, the post of US ambassador to Australia has now been left vacant for 19 months,” she said.

“We hope the government expresses to the United States the importance of this appointment being resolved soon.”

Dr Alan Tidwell, director of the Centre for Australian, New Zealand and Pacific Studies at Georgetown University in Washington DC, agreed it was disappointing.

“It does make one wonder about the meaning of ‘mateship’,” he told AAP.

However, he said it should not be taken personally, but rather reflected the nature of the Trump White House.

Two men speculated to be in line for the Seoul job – retired US Army General James Thurman and outgoing House Foreign Affairs Committee chairman Ed Royce – could now be in the mix for Canberra.

Australian Associated Press

Comments Off on Multi-million dollar ambulance super centre

Multi-million dollar ambulance super centre

Multi-million dollar ambulance super centre

An artist’s impression of the new ambulance station proposed for Aberglasslyn Road, Rutherford.The State Government has announced plans to build a$3.8millionambulance training, education and dispatch centre thatwill employ 32people, onAberglasslyn Road, Rutherford.
Nanjing Night Net

Health Infrastructure NSW has flagged the proposal with Maitland City Council who will now place plans for the state-of-the-art development on exhibition for public comment.

The State plans building two structures on No. 65 Aberglasslyn Road, one building to accommodateon-call Ambulance officers, the other used for training and education purposes.

The site is flanked by a new children’s day care centre and a hardware business.

The station will operate 24 hours a day, seven days a weekand the education facility between 7am and 5pm.

The ambulance station is expected to have a maximum number of 24 staff members working from the site at any given time.

The new Maitland station is part of the State’s $122 million Rural Ambulance Infrastructure Reconfiguration (RAIR) Program.

The program currently includes 23 locations across the state that will benefit from an upgraded, rebuilt or entirely new ambulance station.

It is the biggest regional and rural transformation of NSW Ambulance infrastructure in the organisation’s history.

Designed with input from local ambulance staff the new Maitland station will includeadministration support as well as educational facilities and relief accommodation.

A Health Infrastructure spokesperson said construction on the new station is expected to begin later this year.

Once completed, the station will include:Increased internal parking for up to sevenemergency ambulance vehicles, administration and office areas, amenities, logistics and storage areas, staffparking and aneducation facility and zone office.

“Thenew building will replace the existing 45-year-old station in Gillies Street, Rutherford and will better support paramedics to deliver high quality emergency mobile care to the community,” the spokesperson said.

“All new RAIR station locations are chosen based on careful and extensive modelling of ambulance demand and with important operational considerations in mind such as access to major roads to support effective ambulance response to emergency patients.”

Twenty threeupgraded, rebuilt or new regional and rural ambulance stations have been announced under the State’s RAIR program, including completed stations at Wagga Wagga, Coolamon, Ardlethan and Harden.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Comments Off on NSW woman jailed for running over ex

NSW woman jailed for running over ex

NSW woman jailed for running over ex

A rejected NSW woman drove over her ex-boyfriend before repeatedly punching him as he was trapped under her car in a Christmas Day attack.
Nanjing Night Net

Susan Jane Jongsma’s ex-boyfriend was caught standing in front of a fence when she accelerated towards him in the drive way of his Goulburn home on the afternoon of December 25, 2016.

As he laid pinned at the chest with one leg turned upwards, Jongsma left the driver’s seat of the running vehicle and punched him several times before being pulled away, the NSW District Court heard on Monday.

Jongsma, now 53, was jailed for at least two years and three months over the attack, which she says she doesn’t remember.

Judge Robyn Tupman, in sentencing Jongsma to a maximum of four-and-a-half years, said the “very serious” offence amounted to “a serious overreaction as a result of being rejected in a domestic relationship”.

She said Jongsma had been drinking alcohol at the time of the incident, was suffering a depressive illness and her relationship with the victim was dysfunctional and strained.

Jongsma, who previously committed domestic violence offences, had shown up at the victim’s house after he ignored her messages and turned off his phone.

She soon turned physical and aggressive, trying to choke him and destroying his phone, the court heard.

The man left the house to get help when Jongsma got in her car and drove towards him, steering her vehicle to follow his movements.

The judge said the victim was reported to have made a good physical recovery but continued to suffer the effects of post-traumatic stress disorder.

She said Jongsma, who self-harmed in the wake of the attack and told police she wanted to die, had taken steps towards her rehabilitation and wasn’t the same person that she was then.

Jongsma will be eligible for parole in July 2020.

Readers seeking support and information about suicide prevention can contact Lifeline on 13 11 14.

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467.

National domestic violence helpline: 1800 737 732 or 1800RESPECT. In an emergency call triple-zero.

Australian Associated Press

Comments Off on Thousands flock to Melbourne Anzac service

Thousands flock to Melbourne Anzac service

Thousands flock to Melbourne Anzac service

Thosands, including children, are at Melbourne’s Shrine of Remembrance for the dawn service.Surgeon Annette Holian’s military battles involved scalpels, anaesthetic, blood and dressings.
Nanjing Night Net

The Group Captain and first serving woman to address an Anzac Day dawn service in Melbourne told the tens of thousands packed around the Shrine of Remembrance about courage on the field.

“My medals represent personal hardship, specific challenges and many victories. Medical battles with scalpels, antiseptics, blood and dressing,” she said.

“They remind me of the emotion we faced living in the devastation in Aceh, its streets and rivers choked with the debris of thousands of bodies.”

An estimated 35,000 attended Wednesday’s service, which marks 100 years since the WWI battle of Villers-Bretonneux when Australian soldiers and their allies recaptured crucial territory from the Germans.

The numbers swelled by 10,000 from last year which organisers attributed to better weather and the ongoing commitment of Victorians to honouring service and sacrifice.

One former soldier at the service, Chris Walters, sees that day as more about his father and grandfather.

“I still never see today as respect to me. It’s more I still think of my grandfather (who) served. My dad was in the RAAF for 20 years,” he told AAP.

Mr Walters said the traditional minute’s silence during the service carried mixed emotions.

“I’ve lost friends and I know people who are struggling with things like PTSD and those that have returned.”

For years Vietnam veteran Sui Kamid wasn’t recognised for his service, but this has now changed.

“We never got any recognition for years and years, 20-odd years or so. So it was pretty hard to take in the beginning,” he said.

To reflect the changing face of Anzac Day, current veterans are due to lead the traditional Anzac march down St Kilda Road later on Wednesday.

“It is a decision … that we would turn the march on its head and have the younger veterans matching at the front,” Victorian RSL president Rob Webster told ABC TV.

Australian Associated Press

Comments Off on Australia’s southern-most dawn service an unforgettable experience

Australia’s southern-most dawn service an unforgettable experience

Australia’s southern-most dawn service an unforgettable experience

Australia’s southern-most dawn service an unforgettable experience Australian Antarctic expeditioners participating in dawn service at Casey research station. Picture: George Brettingham-Moore/Australian Antarctic Division
Nanjing Night Net

Australian Antarctic expeditioners participating in dawn service at Casey research station. Picture: George Brettingham-Moore/Australian Antarctic Division

Commander Rebecca Jeffcoat, station leader, participating in dawn service at Casey research station. Picture: George Brettingham-Moore/Australian Antarctic Division

Australian Antarctic expeditioners participating in dawn service at Casey research station. Picture: George Brettingham-Moore/Australian Antarctic Division

Australian Antarctic expeditioners participating in dawn service at Casey research station. Picture: George Brettingham-Moore/Australian Antarctic Division

Australian Antarctic expeditioners participating in dawn service at Casey research station. Picture: George Brettingham-Moore/Australian Antarctic Division

Australian Antarctic expeditioners participating in dawn service at Casey research station. Picture: George Brettingham-Moore/Australian Antarctic Division

Commander Rebecca Jeffcoat, station leader, participating in dawn service at Casey research station. Picture: George Brettingham-Moore/Australian Antarctic Division

TweetFacebookTwenty-six Australians have paid their respects to those served at an Anzac Day they will never forget.

Just before dawn, the winter team at Casey research station in Antarctica, gathered at the station’s flagpole.

Defence Force Naval Officer veteranRebecca Jeffcoat led the ceremony.

Commander Jeffcoat is stationed in the Antarctica as Casey’s station leader, and has been a navy officer since 1990.

“I’ve been to many Anzac Day events over the years and today’s service, held against a backdrop of icebergs in Newcomb Bay, is one I will never forget,” Commander Jeffcoat said.

“We lowered the Australian flag to half-mast, listened to several readings and held the traditional two minutes of silence.

“The service was especially poignant as expeditioners took the opportunity to proudly share their family member’s service experience; in the Boer War, lost at sea in World War II and in Afghanistan.

“As we dig in for a long winter, we can imagine some of the challenges our defence men and women face when deployed to far-off and often hostile places, away from their families, in service of their country.”

A gun-fire breakfast warmed up the expeditioners, in the minus-15 degree temperatures.

They will continue the day with games of two-up, and watching a live broadcast of the Anzac Day AFL game.

The Examiner

Comments Off on 50 of the finest photos from Anzac Day 2018

50 of the finest photos from Anzac Day 2018

50 of the finest photos from Anzac Day 2018

50 of the finest photos from Anzac Day 2018 Multitudes turn out for the Kiama Anzac Day dawn service. Picture: Rebecca Boyd
Nanjing Night Net

Shellharbour’s Anzac Day service on Wednesday. Photo: Sylvia Liber

Early morning, April 25 in Albury. Photo: James Wiltshire

Corporal Hayden Riley of the 219 cadets forms part of the catafalque party in Wagga. Picture: Les Smith

Australian Antarctic expeditioners participating in dawn service at Casey research station. Picture: George Brettingham-Moore/Australian Antarctic Division

Shellharbour’s Anzac Day service on Wednesday. Photo: Sylvia Liber

First light: About 1000 people gathered in Ulverstone for the dawn service. Pictures: Brodie Weeding

Salvation Army bugler Lindsay Stow plays the Last Post at the Warrnambool Dawn Service. Picture: Rob Gunstone

Anzac Day Dawn Service in Bendigo. Picture: Darren Howe

Early morning, April 25 in Albury. Photo: James Wiltshire

First light at Launceston’s Anzac Day dawn service. Photo: Scott Gelston

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach, Newcastle, 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach, Newcastle, 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Marieke Dam, Shay Stein, Julie Pettett, 2018 Anzac Day Horsham dawn service.

Wayne Wild, Maurie Anderson and Frank Logan at Ararat’s 2018 Anzac Day Dawn service on Wednesday. Photo: Peter Pickering

Wednesday morning’s poignant and touching commemoration at Orange’s Robertson Park Cenotaph. Photo: Jude Keogh

At the Tamworth dawn service. Photo: Gareth Gardner

Miranda Anzac Day dawn service. Photo: John Veage

Carly and Damien Batty with their daughter Eva, 4, at Wodonga RSL sub-branch after the dawn service. Picture: Mark Jesser

Ballarat dawn service. Photo: Lachlan Bence.

Wodonga Dawn Service. Photo: Mark Jesser

Wodonga Dawn Service. Photo: Mark Jesser

Tamworth’s main march. Photo: Northern Daily Leader

Inverell’s Anzac Day dawn service.

Dubbo commemorates the fallen.

The dawn service in Moree: Photo: Sophie Harris

Gathering in the early light at Jimboomba. Natalie Hall on Annie. Photo: Lisa Simmons

Trevor Lynch has chronicled the Nambucca Anzacs’ story. Photo: Mel Davies

Women leading the march at Bellingen after the service. Photo: Janene Carey

A scene from Penola’s Anzac Day ceremony.

Berrima Dawn Service was a family affair for Air Commodore Robert Rodgers. Photo: Madeline Crittenden

Members of the 3rd Light Horse Regiment Naracoorte Troop again added a poignant note to the Anzac Day ceremony in Naracoorte.

Mount Isa’s Anzac Day service 2018.

Shane Tobler and Archimedes from the Friends of the Wingecarribee Animal Shelter at the Berrima Dawn Service. Photo: Madeline Crittenden

From Mount Isa’s Anzac Day commemorations.

A scene from Dawesville, WA.

April Richardson from Hill Top Public School and Danielle Horne from Mittagong Public School at the Hill Top Dawn Service. Photo: Emily Bennett.

George Brown at Sebastopol’s Anzac Day service. Photo: Lachlane Bence.

Hundreds of people lined the streets of the Wollongong CBD to watch the 2018 Anzac Day parade.

Hundreds of people lined the streets of the Wollongong CBD to watch the 2018 Anzac Day parade.

Hundreds of people lined the streets of the Wollongong CBD to watch the 2018 Anzac Day parade.

Eaglehawk commemorates Anzac Day. Photo: Glenn Daniels

Eaglehawk commemorates Anzac Day. Photo: Glenn Daniels

Anzac day service at Canowindra. Photo: Rachael Webb

Newcastle march and service. Photo: Simone de Peak

Newcastle march and service. Photo: Simone de Peak

Newcastle march and service. Photo: Simone de Peak

Newcastle march and service. Photo: Simone de Peak

The serving officers march in Tamworth. Photo: Gareth Gardner

TweetFacebookThey lined the sides of roads, gathered atCenotaphs, memorials, and in town centres –men, women and children, all to pay their respects and remember those who have served and those we’ve lost.

Some were serving defence force personnel, others descendants of the fallen or those who’ve served, and others who just wanted to say thank you.

Anzac Day dawn services, marches and community events were held across the nation today as thousands of Australians gathered to commemorate the 103rd anniversary of the landing of Australian and New Zealand troops at Gallipoli.

Women took centre stage this year with their commitments to the armed forces recognised.

Above are some of the best photos from the services across the countrytoday–fromMount Isa to Launceston, Naracoorte to Antarctica!

Comments Off on F1 ace Ricciardo faces August deadline

F1 ace Ricciardo faces August deadline

F1 ace Ricciardo faces August deadline

Australian F1 ace Daniel Ricciardo has been given an August deadline to re-sign with Red Bull.Red Bull boss Christian Horner has given Australian F1 ace Daniel Ricciardo until August to re-sign or the team will begin looking elsewhere.
Nanjing Night Net

The Red Bull boss’ demands follow revelations the 28-year-old has been in negotiations with Italian giants Ferrari.

Six-time Grand Prix winner Ricciardo has become the hottest free agent on the Formula One circuit following his victory in China 10 days ago.

“We do not want to wait forever. We have other good options,” Horner told German magazine Auto Motor Und Sport.

“There should be a decision by the summer (August) break at the latest.”

Horner said the team wants Ricciardo to stay at Red Bull but if it didn’t happen they would look at other options.

“Our priority is to continue working with Daniel. If that does not work, we’ll pull the other options,” Horner said.

“The most obvious is Carlos Sainz. He is under contract with us. And then there are a few young drivers,” he said.

Ricciardo is believed to have begun talks with Ferrari, with both parties locked into negotiations until June 30, according to Motorsport magazine.

Reigning champions Mercedes are also reportedly interested.

Ricciardo has previously said he does not want his next Formula One contract to tie him down.

Instead of the usual four-year-deal, Ricciardo said he wants a two-year contract due to the uncertainty over the sport’s future direction.

Formula One’s current engine regulations last only to the end of 2020, when team agreements also expire, and the sport is deciding how the future should look and what kind of engines will be used.

Ferrari have already warned that they could walk away if they do not like what is on offer.

“Each year something might change so I don’t want to tie myself down for four more years and then I’m like, ‘I don’t want to do this any more,” Ricciardo told The Times.

Meanwhile, Mercedes have yet to announce a new deal for four-times world champion Lewis Hamilton, who is also out of contract at the end of this season.

Australian Associated Press

Comments Off on Thousands stand solemn for Anzac Day dawn service in Newcastle

Thousands stand solemn for Anzac Day dawn service in Newcastle

Thousands stand solemn for Anzac Day dawn service in Newcastle

Thousands stand solemn for Anzac Day dawn service in Newcastle Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.
Nanjing Night Net

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

TweetFacebookLast Postwas played by a bugler, the rain still drizzling and showing no sign of letting up.

But the solemn crowd was undeterred even though most were not carrying umbrellas.

Flashback:Remember Anzac Day in 2017

They jolted back again at the startling sound of cannon fire fromFortScratchley before acatafalque party concluded formal proceedings.

Mr Fayle became teary as he thanked the city for putting the Nobbys dawn service “on the map”.

The sub-branch president also announced he would be stepping down from his role as emcee to allow younger blood to come through.

“I could not be prouder of what you have done in this city,” he said.

“You have put us on the map. People outside [Newcastle] do not believe what you’ve done with your attendance and commitment.”

Official crowd figures were still being determined but Mr Fayle said it appeared to him the crowdwas on par with previous years (estimates typically place between 30,000 and 40,000 at the service).

Read more:Your complete guide to Anzac Day services in Newcastle and the Hunter

That is despite the inconvenience of road closures for the light rail project.

And security is tight with some city streets blocked off with garbage trucks and skip bins to guard against vehicle attacks.

Spectators were urged to use the park and ride bus service from McDonald Jones Stadium.

Thecrowd quickly dispersed from Nobbysas the rain became heavier.

The sunrise over Nobbys beach did not appear this dawn service because of cloud cover, but those who flocked to the beach still looked out over the ocean and reflected quietly among themselves.

Others made plans for coffee, and city centre cafes appeared to be doing a roaring trade.

Share your Anzac Day photos: send your photos to [email protected]南京夜网.au