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Monthly Archives: August 2018

Comments Off on A-League: Focused Jets staying ground on finals mission

A-League: Focused Jets staying ground on finals mission

A-League: Focused Jets staying ground on finals mission

Focused: Roy O’Donovan at Newcastle Jets training on Tuesday. Picture: Simone De PeakROY O’Donovan declared on day oneat the Newcastle Jets that he had joined the club to play finals football.
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Newcastlehad not long collected the wooden spoon and hadn’t featured in an A-League post-season in seven years.Unperturbed, the Irishman made his intent known from the get-go.

Fast-forward nine months–15 wins,50 points and second place–theJets are on the eve of fulfilling that mission.

They host Melbourne City in a grand final qualifier at McDonald Jones Stadium on Friday night.

However, O’Donovan won’tbe satisfied unless they takeat least one step further.

“I am excited about finals football, I am excited about the possibilities, but I am not getting carried away,” O’Donovan said.“You still have to do your job.Bigger teams than the Newcastle Jets have been turned over by getting carried away with themselves. That is not going to happen here.Nobody wants to go out in the semi-final. Sometimes the semi-final is more important than the final in a way.Ifwe play the way we have played this year, and toour strengths, I don’t have any fear.”

Fever pitch. @NewcastleJetsFC striker Roy O’Donovan has played a cup final at Wembley and in Asia but this will be his first in the @ALeague. @newcastleheraldpic.twitter南京夜网/EytlWF2clM

— James Gardiner (@JamesGardiner42) April 24, 2018TweetFacebookRoy O’Donovan back in the groove at @NewcastleJetsFC training ahead of @ALeague final v @[email protected]南京夜网/0fMQAWsHgU

— James Gardiner (@JamesGardiner42) April 24, 2018Finishing School. Dimi finds the net @NewcastleJetsFC training. @[email protected]南京夜网/Er7CBtMILa

— James Gardiner (@JamesGardiner42) April 24, 2018

“I feel good,” he said“I’mfinallycatching back up from all the injuries,” he said.“I think the team has mirrored that. The past couple of weeks we have gotten better and learned some lessons. We went back to basics a little bit against the Mariners.When we have played well this year, the likes of Dimi Petratos, Ronny Vargas and SteveUgarkovic have been on their game and we have defended well. When we do that wehave been a very hard team to play against. We have a lot of energy and I expect that on Friday night.”

Jets captain Nigel Boogaard (leg) and marquee Vargas (groin)trained strongly on Tuesday and barring a mishap will play on Friday night.

“Nigelis a very important player for us,” O’Donovan said.“Him and Topor-Stanley together are a really tough act to play against.People are back to full fitness and looking good.We need as much experience on the field as possible.”

Comments Off on Good times on tour with Leo Sayer and friends

Good times on tour with Leo Sayer and friends

Good times on tour with Leo Sayer and friends

LEGENDS: Russell Morris, Leo Sayer, Marcia Hines, Brian Cadd and John Paul Young Perform at Newcastle’s Civic Theatre on June 7. Leo Sayer is turning 70 in May, not that you’d know it. He has a lust for life and a youthful exuberance that puts many a teenager to shame.
Nanjing Night Net

Leo SayerLove Is InThe Air, Brian and I were the only ones to make real appearances in the American charts.Whenever we get together we play blues and rock ‘n roll because he is just an ace keyboard player and I love singing with him.”

Marcia Hines? “I would always bump into her at gigs, often charity gigs. She is remarkably friendly, one of those easygoing people that you instantly feel comfortable with,” Sayer explains.

“You climb into the second question, as it were, when you’re with her. There are no formalities. We get along like a house on fire. And I love singing with her because she has a lot of personality in her voice. There are a lot of singers that sing well, but Marcia has always got a smile in her voice. Her personality shines through the way she phrases and sings words and I like that.”

Sayer laughs when Russell Morris is mentioned.

“Russ and I go way back. He was around when I was first doing Countdown with Molly.Russis an incredible practical joker –he’s the guy who comes up behind you and pushes the back of your leg and you kind of collapse, you know?

“He grabs you by the back of the throat without even warning you. He’s just terrible like that. But he is a lot of fun to work with. And the other thing is, you see, we both share the bass player Mitch Cairns. We know all the same people and have worked with all the same musicians and we are just mates. Old campaigners, you know?”

And last but not least, John Paul Young.

“Ah, JP –Mr Mischief. John is lovely and honestly I don’t know if he would agree with this but you could put us together and you’d think we were brothers,” Sayer says.

“It’s not only the height. We seem to think the same things and do the same thingsat the same moment. He’s a lovely affable guy but he’s not got much time for bullshit. You’ve got to be straight to the point with JP. If there’s a discussion going on among all the artists it will be me and JP that turn around and say ‘No, f ––– off, this is not going to work. This is how it’s going to be’.

“We were doing a medley of Good Timesone time and he spotted that I was singing it too high at the start, the ‘Mary Mary’ bit,” Sayer muses, singing it to me. “Anyway he comes quietly up and goes ‘Leo, you know on the original it started a lot lower than that.’I said ‘I can’t do it mate’ and he said ‘Well stay where you are then’ and walked away. There’s no BS with John andthat’s what I really, really like. He’s the least show-business of all the guys you’ll ever meet. Just a regular bloke, totally trustworthy.

“It’s a very evenly matched troupe, this one.”

As for Sayer, who gave us the timeless You Make Me Feel Like Dancing, he has been busy writing his autobiography. He has two storage sheds where he keeps 50-plus years of newspaper clippingsand memorabilia, and one has a chair and a lamp.

This is serious business.

“I am 33,000 words in. They say the dodgy part is the 20,000-word mark and you have to climb over that and then you’re all right. I’m about halfway through 1975 at the moment,” he says.

“My Mum and Dad kept every itinerary and postcard that I sent them so that’s been useful. They really describe how it was and what I was feeling, so they are an accurate map of my life at the time. I did so much, you see, that Ican’t keep up with myself.

“We were prolific back then, oftendoing two or three shows a night.”

This book has the potential to rival Tolstoy’s War and Peace in volume.

“Friggin’ hell, you could say that. One point, though –so many autobiographies are sob stories but not mine. I’m the happiest person in the world,” he says.

“Sure, I’ve had some really bloodyawful f –––ing situations but I’ve gotten over all of them.I think I have survived pretty well intact.

“I’mvery happy and still wanting to do my job and still enjoying it and thejob is still successful, so I can’t say that I’ve got anything to complain about.”

The APIA Good Times Tour stops at Newcastle’s Civic Theatre on June 7. Tickets are on sale through Ticketek or at the venue’s box office.

Comments Off on Paul Carter escapes sanction for tackle on Maitland’s Jarrod Smith

Paul Carter escapes sanction for tackle on Maitland’s Jarrod Smith

Paul Carter escapes sanction for tackle on Maitland’s Jarrod Smith

Paul Carter escapes sanction for tackle on Maitland’s Jarrod Smith Paul Carter
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TweetFacebook Newcastle RL: Wests v CentralPictures by Max Mason-HubersCessnock coach Al Lantry believes justice has prevailed with five-eighth Paul Carter having no case to answer after being placed on report with an alleged high tackle during the loss to Maitland last weekend.

Carter was penalised for a high shot on Maitland’s Jarrod Smith during the Goannas’ disastrous 36-0 loss to the Pickers at Maitland Sportsground but after reviewing footage of the incident on Tuesday, the NSWRL match review committee opted not to charge the former NRL player.

Lantry said he was always confident Carter would not be charged.

“It was high and definitely a penalty but even John Taylor [referee] on the field said‘I’m not saying it was intentional or deliberate’,” he said.

“It was a penalty, fair enough but nothing more than that. I was telling people yesterday when they askedme what I thought he’dget that I’d be filthy if he even gets a week.”

Lantry said he was “gutted” by the performance of his side in the heavy opening round defeat.

“I still don’t know what happened,” he said.

“We just didn’t turn up and were out-enthused. Everything we worked for in the pre-season, everything we are good at –we did the exact opposite.

“I’m gutted with what happened.”

Lantry agreed his side was guilty of taking the opposition too lightly and paid a significant price.

They take on Kurri in a local derby at home onSaturday.

Comments Off on How the Hunter marked Anzac Day 2018photos, video

How the Hunter marked Anzac Day 2018photos, video

How the Hunter marked Anzac Day 2018photos, video

How the Hunter marked Anzac Day 2018 | photos, video Photo: Jonathan Carroll
Nanjing Night Net

Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Photo: Max Mason-Hubers

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day 2018 dawn service at Maitland Park

Anzac Day 2018 dawn service at Maitland Park

Anzac Day 2018 dawn service at Maitland Park

Anzac Day 2018 dawn service at Maitland Park

Anzac Day 2018 dawn service at Maitland Park

Anzac Day 2018 dawn service at Maitland Park

Anzac Day 2018 dawn service at Maitland Park

Anzac Day 2018 dawn service at Maitland Park

Anzac Day 2018 dawn service at Maitland Park

Cessnock’s Anzac Day dawn service. Picture: Krystal Sellars

Cessnock’s Anzac Day dawn service. Picture: Krystal Sellars

Cessnock’s Anzac Day dawn service. Picture: Krystal Sellars

Cessnock’s Anzac Day dawn service. Picture: Krystal Sellars

Cessnock’s Anzac Day dawn service. Picture: Krystal Sellars

Cessnock’s Anzac Day dawn service. Picture: Krystal Sellars

Cessnock’s Anzac Day dawn service. Picture: Krystal Sellars

Wollombi dawn service. Picture: Catherine Waterton

Cessnock’s Anzac Day dawn service. Picture: Krystal Sellars

Wollombi dawn service. Picture: Catherine Waterton

Wollombi dawn service. Picture: Catherine Waterton

Cessnock’s Anzac Day dawn service. Picture: Krystal Sellars

Cessnock’s Anzac Day dawn service. Picture: Krystal Sellars

Clarence Town’s dawn service. Picture: Michelle Mexon

Clarence Town’s dawn service. Picture: Michelle Mexon

Clarence Town’s dawn service. Picture: Michelle Mexon

Clarence Town’s dawn service. Picture: Michelle Mexon

Clarence Town’s dawn service. Picture: Michelle Mexon

Scenes from the Nelson Bay dawn service in Apex Park. Pictures: Ellie-Marie Watts

Scenes from the Nelson Bay dawn service in Apex Park. Pictures: Ellie-Marie Watts

Scenes from the Nelson Bay dawn service in Apex Park. Pictures: Ellie-Marie Watts

Scenes from the Nelson Bay dawn service in Apex Park. Pictures: Ellie-Marie Watts

Scenes from the Nelson Bay dawn service in Apex Park. Pictures: Ellie-Marie Watts

Scenes from the Nelson Bay dawn service in Apex Park. Pictures: Ellie-Marie Watts

Scenes from the Nelson Bay dawn service in Apex Park. Pictures: Ellie-Marie Watts

Scenes from the Nelson Bay dawn service in Apex Park. Pictures: Ellie-Marie Watts

Scenes from the Nelson Bay dawn service in Apex Park. Pictures: Ellie-Marie Watts

Scenes from the Nelson Bay dawn service in Apex Park. Pictures: Ellie-Marie Watts

Scenes from the Nelson Bay dawn service in Apex Park. Pictures: Ellie-Marie Watts

Scenes from the Nelson Bay dawn service in Apex Park. Pictures: Ellie-Marie Watts

Scenes from the Nelson Bay dawn service in Apex Park. Pictures: Ellie-Marie Watts

Scenes from the Nelson Bay dawn service in Apex Park. Pictures: Ellie-Marie Watts

LEST WE FORGET: Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

Soldiers and their families at Lone Pine Barracks for Dawn Service. Picture:Louise Nichols

Soldiers and their families at Lone Pine Barracks for Dawn Service. Picture:Louise Nichols

Soldiers and their families at Lone Pine Barracks for Dawn Service. Picture:Louise Nichols

Soldiers and their families at Lone Pine Barracks for Dawn Service. Picture:Louise Nichols

Soldiers and their families at Lone Pine Barracks for Dawn Service. Picture:Louise Nichols

Denman Anzac Day Dawn Service. Picture: Rod Thompson

Denman Anzac Day Dawn Service. Picture: Rod Thompson

Denman Anzac Day Dawn Service. Picture: Rod Thompson

Denman Anzac Day Dawn Service. Picture: Rod Thompson

Denman Anzac Day Dawn Service. Picture: Rod Thompson

Denman Anzac Day Dawn Service. Picture: Rod Thompson

Denman Anzac Day Dawn Service. Picture: Rod Thompson

Scone pays its respects at 2018 Anzac Day dawn serviceCaitlin Reid

Scone pays its respects at 2018 Anzac Day dawn serviceCaitlin Reid

Scone pays its respects at 2018 Anzac Day dawn serviceCaitlin Reid

Scone pays its respects at 2018 Anzac Day dawn serviceCaitlin Reid

Scone pays its respects at 2018 Anzac Day dawn serviceCaitlin Reid

Scone pays its respects at 2018 Anzac Day dawn serviceCaitlin Reid

Scone pays its respects at 2018 Anzac Day dawn serviceCaitlin Reid

Scone pays its respects at 2018 Anzac Day dawn serviceCaitlin Reid

Scone pays its respects at 2018 Anzac Day dawn serviceCaitlin Reid

Scone pays its respects at 2018 Anzac Day dawn serviceCaitlin Reid

Scone pays its respects at 2018 Anzac Day dawn serviceCaitlin Reid

Scone pays its respects at 2018 Anzac Day dawn serviceCaitlin Reid

Scone pays its respects at 2018 Anzac Day dawn serviceCaitlin Reid

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day at West Wallsend. Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Anzac Day march and service at Newcastle. Photo: Simone de Peak

Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Photo: Jonathan Carroll

Photo: Max Mason-Hubers

Photo: Max Mason-Hubers

Photo: Max Mason-Hubers

Photo: Max Mason-Hubers

Photo: Max Mason-Hubers

Photo: Max Mason-Hubers

Photo: Max Mason-Hubers

Photo: Max Mason-Hubers

Photo: Max Mason-Hubers

Photo: Max Mason-Hubers

Photo: Max Mason-Hubers

Photo: Max Mason-Hubers

Photo: Max Mason-Hubers

Photo: Max Mason-Hubers

Photo: Max Mason-Hubers

Photo: Max Mason-Hubers

Photo: Max Mason-Hubers

Photo: Max Mason-Hubers

Photo: Max Mason-Hubers

Photo: Max Mason-Hubers

Photo: Max Mason-Hubers

Photo: Max Mason-Hubers

Photo: Max Mason-Hubers

Photo: Max Mason-Hubers

Photo: Max Mason-Hubers

Photo: Max Mason-Hubers

Photo: Max Mason-Hubers

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Photo: Max Mason-Hubers

Photo: Max Mason-Hubers

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Photo: Max Mason-Hubers

TweetFacebookWatch the servicesNewcastle: Thousands braved the rain and packed intoCampShortlandto pay tribute to serving men and women in the first ofNewcastle’s Anzac Day commemorations.

Maitland: People of all ages stood in reflection asMaitland RSL Sub-Branch hosted the commemoration service.

Lieutenant Commander Robert Rudge from the Royal Australian Navy gave a moving address, turning all attention to the memory of those who gave the greatest sacrifice.

Cessnock:More than 2000 people gathered at the Cessnock war memorial for the 5.30am service to remember that day, 103 years ago, when the Australian troops landed at Gallipoli.

Clarence Town:“If the diggers can fight in the rain, we can stand in the rain.”

Those were the words from a man in the crowd when heavy rain bucketed down midway through Clarence Town’s Dawn Service.

Medowie:In a town of little more than 10,000 people, organisers of the Anzac Day dawn service at Medowie were very pleased with the turnout.

Nelson Bay:Apex Park was a sea of umberellas on Wednesday morning as rain poured down on the Nelson Bay dawn service.

Reveille in the rain. Nelson Bay dawn service pelted by rain this morning. Still didn’t deter about 300 people (just an estimate. Hard to tell because of all the umbrellas) #PortStephens#AnzacDay2018pic.twitter南京夜网/OkhIjHsUvi

— Ellie-Marie Watts (@E1MaWa) April 24, 2018Share you Anzac Day photos: Send your photos to [email protected]南京夜网.au

Comments Off on Titans drop Elgey for defensive lapses

Titans drop Elgey for defensive lapses

Titans drop Elgey for defensive lapses

Gold Coast five-eighth Kane Elgey has been dropped in favor of Bryce Cartwright.Gold Coast have dropped playmaker Kane Elgey for his defensive frailties with Bryce Cartwright to pull on the No.6 jersey for Saturday’s NRL clash against Cronulla.
Nanjing Night Net

It’s coach Garth Brennan’s first big call of his tenure, dumping his five-eighth to Queensland Cup to work on what he described as deficiencies in his game.

Elgey paid the price for a number of costly one-on-one misses in last week’s loss to North Queensland.

“I explained to him today, he’s aware and understands the areas he needs to work on, mainly defensively and taking more control of the team and working with Ash (Taylor),” Brennan said.

“He get a chance to run the team and get more confidence – I think that’s what Kane needs.”

Brennan denied his decision would affect extension talks with the off-contract playmaker and said he expected him to be back in first grade soon.

“He’s very much part of my plans,” Brennan said.

Cartwright has previously expressed his unwillingness to play five-eighth and desire to stay in the back-row.

Despite Cartwright’s defensive lapses being widely noted, Brennan said the move was best for the team.

“If you go back to the best football Bryce played, when everyone talked about him being close to Origin selection, that was in 2016 and he was playing five-eighth,” Brennan said.

“It’s not a position that’s foreign to him. He’s played NRL as a six and I’m more than confident Bryce will do the job for me.”

The Titans have also dropped winger Tyronne Roberts-Davis with Brendan Elliot to come into the backline.

In some much-needed good news for Cronulla, Wade Graham (hamstring) is back however Luke Lewis (calf) will be missing against the Titans.

In other team news, Connor Watson will make a timely comeback and slot straight into the halves in place of Mitchell Pearce (pec).

As expected, Brisbane named Josh McGuire at No.9 in place of Andrew McCullough (elbow) with Kodi Nikorima to spend time at dummy-half off the bench.

In-form youngster Cameron Murray returns from a hamstring injury and will wear the South Sydney No.13 with Sam Burgess once again suspended.

North Queensland workhorse Shaun Fensom will play his first game since suffering a broken leg during last year’s grand final, replacing John Asiata (pec).

With Jarryd Hayne once again out, Bevan French comes onto the Parramatta wing after recovering from a shoulder problem.

Matthew Wright replaces Manly winger Brad Parker (knee) while Wests Tigers back-rower Chris Lawrence is also back.

Australian Associated Press

Comments Off on Angry Qld cop killed his baby with punch

Angry Qld cop killed his baby with punch

Angry Qld cop killed his baby with punch

A Supreme Court judge said Senior Constable Colin Randall killed his baby in a “horrendous attack”.Senior Constable Colin David Randall was so frustrated a work transfer was refused that when he was left alone with his baby son for the first time, he punched him to death.
Nanjing Night Net

Then 37, he struck his 10-week-old baby Kye in the stomach with such force it “pulped” his liver, ruptured organs and bruised the boy’s lower back.

For three-and-a-half years after killing his son he lied to his wife, medical staff and investigators, but his ruse came undone when he pleaded guilty to manslaughter last Friday.

After Kye died in hospital in June 2014, Randall pretended it was due to injuries caused when he had incorrectly performed CPR.

His story was that he had put Kye in a swing and set about vacuuming his home, only to find him limp and unresponsive.

And for a while Randall’s wife Debbra Chambers believed him.

“For 18 solid months after Kye died, I was lied to, manipulated, deceived by the man who I was married to, believing Kye’s death was a tragic accident somehow and all his father did was try and save him,” she told Brisbane Supreme Court on Tuesday.

“I believed everything you said. I trusted you being my husband, my closest partner, the father of my children and a serving police officer.”

What really happened between Randall and Kye was revealed in court as preparations were made to sentence him for manslaughter, following the plea that came one week before he was due to face trial charged with murder.

Crown prosecutor Phil McCarthy said the day had started much the same as any other.

The usual routines were undertaken until Ms Chambers popped out to nearby shops.

She left Randall alone with their boy for the first time, unaware of how frustrated he had become.

The court heard Randall, a former science teacher, had been having an affair with a police administrative worker from Hervey Bay and was fixated on moving his family there.

After making arrangements to relocate, his plans were dashed when police knocked back his transfer request.

This led to an act of extreme violence, in which he lashed out and killed his son.

“It’s just an horrendous attack on a 10-week-old baby,” Justice Peter Davis said.

It left the boy with severe internal injuries, from which he never recovered.

“The child went into cardiac arrest because of the trauma,” Mr McCarthy said.

He was taken to hospital and for two-and-a-half hours unsuccessful attempts were made to resuscitate him.

Mr McCarthy told the court Randall should be given a sentence comparable to Heidi Strbak.

She was jailed five months ago for a minimum four years for killing her four-year-old son.

Randall remains suspended from the police force and is expected to be dismissed after being sentenced in the coming weeks.

Australian Associated Press

Comments Off on Short Takes Friday April 27: readers have their say on the day’s news

Short Takes Friday April 27: readers have their say on the day’s news

Short Takes Friday April 27: readers have their say on the day’s news

CARL Stevenson, being a fan of all sport I strongly believe that traditions should be respected therefore Olympic athletes should all compete naked. I just hope this doesn’t inspire a Matt Shirvington come back.
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Steve Barnett,Fingal BayTHE proposed development at the old Store building looks great. It will totally revitalise the west end. I just hope and pray the Awabakal land council doesn’t try to acquire the site.

Stephen Paynter,New LambtonAbsolutely disgusting!Not only does he dive, but it seems Billy Slatercan knock on and still be rewarded. In my eyes he is a disgrace to the wonderful game of rugby league. However, the bunker has a lot to answer too. Is it any wonder AFL is fast overtaking crowd and player numbers in our state? I for one turned to another channel last Friday night as I am sick to death of overpaid players and administrators.

Matt McAlary,WaratahTHERE werea couple of glaring issues while watching the Broncos vs. Storm game.A40/20 kick which was a bit dodgy, and then a kick through by Billy Slater that in the referee’s opinion was a drop kick and therefore awarded a try. The only time I’ve seen a drop kick to be deemed legal is an attempted field goal or a kick-off. Even Billy Slater indicated he dropped itin the process of kicking the ball through. While it appears to be a referring error, there needto be 40/20 posts to determine more accurate kicks in general play.

Neil Meyers,Warners BayIS THAT the same Michael Cotts that worked at Big Harry’s Place? Good to see you haven’t changed, still a character.

Darren Duffy,Bobs FarmANDREW Whitbread-Brown (Short Takes 24/4):global coal production was7200m tonnes in 2016, double what it was 40 years previously. It is estimated that coal production will continue to increase out to 2040 at least. Coal is so this century.

Peter Devey,MerewetherANDREW Constance has ruined Newcastle for the people in the Hunter.We did not want to get off the train at Wickham, like the Maitland people and go a very short trip to Newcastle on a Bus. Can not put bikes and others on a bus or one day a light Rail. The people that have shops in Hunter Street are suffering. The money should have been spent on the beach wall at Stockton, Hospitals & Schools. He knows how to waste money.

George Tattersell,New LambtonFANCY putting a main road in the middle of an industrial centre. Munibung Road will be a black spot for accidents with all the trucks and couriers in and out of business driveways. Wake up to yourself, Lake Macquarie Council, before someone gets hurt.

Ross Jurd,EdgeworthTHE Greens want to drop the voting age to 16. The reason is simple enough: only people with undeveloped, juvenile brains vote green, a quick fix to the downturn of green support.

Steve Barnett,Fingal Bay

Comments Off on Bengalla and Mount Pleasant settle stoush

Bengalla and Mount Pleasant settle stoush

Bengalla and Mount Pleasant settle stoush

SPECIAL DELIVERY: Coal wagons being loaded for shipment to Newcastle before use by Aurizon to haul coal for mining company MACH EnergyNEIGHBOURING Hunter coal mines Bengalla and Mount Pleasant have ended a court dispute brought by Bengalla in April last year.
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Under the agreement, Mount Pleasant’s owner MACH Energy has agreed to remove infrastructure it had put up on land that Bengalla argued would hinder its future development.

MACH had disputed Bengalla’s assertion,but after settling their differences, MACH has until the end of October 2022 to pull down the disputed rail infrastructure and Bengalla will provide it with an alternative site.

Bengalla has also agreed to pay MACH $12 million in instalments.

The Mount Pleasant mine was proposed for many years by Coal & Allied, which sold it to MACH for $220 million in 2016.

MACH began building infrastructure soon after, and last month, theQueensland-based rail company Aurizon announced the arrival of 32 coal wagons in Newcastle it said weredestined for MACH Energy, as part of a larger consignment of 284 wagons.

“The new wagons will enter service for our newest customers, AGL Macquarie andMACHEnergy, demonstrating the strong growth we have seen in our New South Wales Coal haulage operations since we started in 2005,” Aurizon NSW manager Catherine Baxter said.

MACH energy criticised the Bengalla court action from the start, saying it was entitled to build the infrastructure where it had.

The Bengalla action was brought by shareholder New Hope Corporation, which said that under Mount Pleasant’s 1999 development approval, the mine owners were required toconsultwith Bengalla over access and coal-carrying infrastructure.

In a statement issued on Tuesday afternoon, the two parties said the proceedings wereto be discontinued, with each party bearing its own costs.

The statement said Bengalla wouldsupport the two applications lodged by MACH to modify the Mount Pleasant development consent, to extend the life of the Mount Pleasant Mine from 2020 to 2026 and to construct its long-term rail and associated infrastructure.

It said Bengalla would provide land to MACH to buildits long-term rail and associated infrastructure.

MACH had agreed to remove its existing, short-term rail and other infrastructure, which waslocated south of Wybong Road, Muswellbrook, by October 31, 2022, in order to make way for continuation of Bengalla’s mining operations south of Wybong Road.

MACH would transfer the contested land to Bengalla by the same date.

Bengalla would pay$12 million to MACH, by instalments.

“The relocation of MACH’s Infrastructure from Bengalla’s approved expansion area was always intended under each mine’s relevant approvals and will allow operations at both mines to continue unimpeded,” the joint statement said.

“The continued operation of both mines will generate significant employment opportunities and economic benefits for the local community and the state of NSW.”

Comments Off on Strikers on-tune in semi-final hunt

Strikers on-tune in semi-final hunt

Strikers on-tune in semi-final hunt

HIGH TALLY: Kahibah and Singleton played out a 5-goal match at Kahibah Oval, the second high-scoring match at the field in as many outings. Picture: Hunter Sports PhotographySingleton have continued their strong start to the 2018 season with a win away from home at Kahibah Oval.
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The Strikers remain in the hunt for finals football in their campaign after the 3-2 victory over Kahibah, and now sit equal on points with fourth-placed West Wallsend.

It took only four minutes for the travelling side to stamp their authority on the match, with Joe Civello opening the scoring.

Strikers on-tune in semi-final hunt The Strikers downed Kahibah in a 3-2 victory away from home on the weekend. Picture: Hunter Sports Photography

The Strikers downed Kahibah in a 3-2 victory away from home on the weekend. Picture: Hunter Sports Photography

The Strikers downed Kahibah in a 3-2 victory away from home on the weekend. Picture: Hunter Sports Photography

The Strikers downed Kahibah in a 3-2 victory away from home on the weekend. Picture: Hunter Sports Photography

The Strikers downed Kahibah in a 3-2 victory away from home on the weekend. Picture: Hunter Sports Photography

West Wallsend ended Cessnock’s undefeated start to the 2018 season in the Northern League One. Picture: Valentine Sports Photography

West Wallsend ended Cessnock’s undefeated start to the 2018 season in the Northern League One. Picture: Valentine Sports Photography

West Wallsend ended Cessnock’s undefeated start to the 2018 season in the Northern League One. Picture: Valentine Sports Photography

West Wallsend ended Cessnock’s undefeated start to the 2018 season in the Northern League One. Picture: Valentine Sports Photography

West Wallsend ended Cessnock’s undefeated start to the 2018 season in the Northern League One. Picture: Valentine Sports Photography

West Wallsend ended Cessnock’s undefeated start to the 2018 season in the Northern League One. Picture: Valentine Sports Photography

West Wallsend ended Cessnock’s undefeated start to the 2018 season in the Northern League One. Picture: Valentine Sports Photography

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Comments Off on Cheaper coffee would be a shot in the arm

Cheaper coffee would be a shot in the arm

Cheaper coffee would be a shot in the arm

BREW IT UP: Reader Stuart Benjamin says Australian coffee’s reliance on espresso, rather than filtered varieties that are common overseas, has left prices here inflated.
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I HAVE travelled overseas for many years and I am a coffee fan, so I look for the best coffee deal locally. In the USA and Europe I have found a freedom of choice between filter coffee and espresso coffee, but at different prices. Filter coffee is priced at around $2-$3 and espresso coffee is priced around $4-$5 because of different overheads. This means that it is cheaper to produce a cup of paper or metal filter coffee than it is to produce a cup of espresso machine coffee.

I have chosen to buy both filter coffee and espresso coffee when overseas depending on my budget and they are both very good value according to their price. Compared to USA and Europe, I thinkAustralian coffee production is overpriced as it relies almost exclusively on the espresso machine for coffee production and has no freedom of choice. There is no cheaper alternative such as the metal or paper coffee filter being produced for the coffee customer.

I can only advise our coffee roasters and cafés to embrace freedom of choice going forward and produce a cheaper cup of coffee for the choice of the coffee customer. Espresso coffee and filter coffee together as equals. Advance Australia Fair.

Stuart Benjamin,Anna BayIT’S A DROP IN THE OCEANHUNTER Water are giving the general public large figures of $100,000 per property (‘End of the line: locals facing town water cut’, Herald,20/4). Although this is true, I would like to ask all Hunter Water customers if they would pay an extra $5 a year for fiveyears?This is all it would costfor us to have our permanent drinking water supply restored to a quality that meets the Australian drinking water guidelines.

The Chichester Dam, which is at the end of our road, is the most cost effective water supply for Hunter Water and therefore is its chosen water supply. Hunter water send 70 per centof their profits to the state government, and very little of that money gets spent in the Hunter.Please get behind us and help us restore our permanent domestic water supply that we have had for 60 years.

Jenni Denniss, DungogDON’T DRUDGE AT DREDGINGI THINK Swansea LaborMPYasmin Catley and Liberal Senator ScotMacDonald should take a step back when calling for year-round dredging of the Swansea Channel. The politicians should be calling for an independent environmental impact study.

Sixty years ago the council dredged Swansea South to makethreedeep canals, one along the shoreline and two deeperfor a handful of boats. The canal along the shoreline destroyed a deep inletinto a large pristine basin that was full of sunlight, with a sandy bottom surrounded with rich mud flatswhere a host of marine animals thrived. The solider crabs and seashellhabitats werelost overnight.All the dredged sand was dumped, making two islands along both canals. Theystopping the tides from flushing and spreading the sand throughout the lake, the beginning of the mouth of the lake being choked with sand.Over time huge mounds of sand has been dumped around Swan Bay, off Coon Island and near Swansea bridge.The tides are fighting to sift itback to where it should be and the boats are getting stuck.I think the Islands should be slowly pushed back into the canals and sand mounds should be spread out into the dredged areas, allowing the tides to heal theentrance. Boats should be modifiedfor lake use.A free-flowing channel and tides spreading thesand throughout the lakeis what’s needed.

Maureen O’Sullivan Davidson, SwanseaGIVING US ALL WE’VE GOTTHIS time it’s the Herald reporting that Britainis not reliant on coal for power generation (‘No coal for three days’, Herald,26/4).”Power generated from wind and gas dominated” a spokesman was quoted. The full story is that Britain’s energy sources are42 per cent gas, 21 per cent nuclear, 9 per cent coal, 24 per cent renewables (wind, solar and tidal) with shortfalls from interconnectors.Google tells me that Australia’s sources are 13 per centgas, 0 per cent nuclear, 73 per cent coal, 8 per cent hydro and 6 per cent wind and solar. OK, one could infer by comparison that we could increase our use of renewables, but it is disingenuous to imagine that we could eliminate coal and keep the lights on!

Bill Nolan, JewellsNOT MUCHTO SMILE ABOUTWHEN the Transport Minister Andrew Constance came to Newcastle announcing what would happen to the Store building (‘City on the rise’, Herald, 21/4),he also said people should stop being negative and embrace the changes in Newcastle. However, it is hard to embrace changes that make getting into and out of the city more difficult, particularly after the closure of the railway destroyed a fast direct service.

It’s hard to embrace change that makes public transport very difficult to use when bus timetables make sense to only a fortunate few. It’s difficult to embrace change when beautiful heritage buildings of considerable significance are destroyed. It’s difficult to embrace changes that don’t make senseand leaderswon’t listen to those who are most affected.

Peter Sansom,KahibahEAST, WEST, THERE’S UNRESTEAST End residents have copped criticism over their opposition to the Supercars. Now Tony Mansfield (Short Takes, 24/4) seems to be revelling in the fact that, despite their objections, the East End is now jam-packed with cars and the area is buzzing on weekends because of this event. This seems a bit ironic from someone who lives in the suburb where the residents complain and often abuse people parking to attend events at the stadium,or is that a small minority?

Barry Reed, IslingtonFREE RIDES MUST FINISHWITH all the disturbance on CBD streets, I do understand it is difficult for cyclists to get around, but that does not mean you can ride on the footpath. Firstly it is illegal, and secondly it is downright dangerous. From what I have seen the worst offenders are young adults attending university at the CBD campus. They have the nerve to tell pedestrians to get out of the way, even mobility-impaired pedestrians.

I think it is about time councilrangers or the police clamped down on this illegal and dangerous behaviour with fines on the spot.

Nigel Dale, HamiltonLETTER OF THE WEEKTHIS week’s pen goes to Brian Suters, of The Junction, for his letter about Carrington pump house.