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Comments Off on Short Takes Friday April 27: readers have their say on the day’s news

Short Takes Friday April 27: readers have their say on the day’s news

Short Takes Friday April 27: readers have their say on the day’s news

CARL Stevenson, being a fan of all sport I strongly believe that traditions should be respected therefore Olympic athletes should all compete naked. I just hope this doesn’t inspire a Matt Shirvington come back.
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Steve Barnett,Fingal BayTHE proposed development at the old Store building looks great. It will totally revitalise the west end. I just hope and pray the Awabakal land council doesn’t try to acquire the site.

Stephen Paynter,New LambtonAbsolutely disgusting!Not only does he dive, but it seems Billy Slatercan knock on and still be rewarded. In my eyes he is a disgrace to the wonderful game of rugby league. However, the bunker has a lot to answer too. Is it any wonder AFL is fast overtaking crowd and player numbers in our state? I for one turned to another channel last Friday night as I am sick to death of overpaid players and administrators.

Matt McAlary,WaratahTHERE werea couple of glaring issues while watching the Broncos vs. Storm game.A40/20 kick which was a bit dodgy, and then a kick through by Billy Slater that in the referee’s opinion was a drop kick and therefore awarded a try. The only time I’ve seen a drop kick to be deemed legal is an attempted field goal or a kick-off. Even Billy Slater indicated he dropped itin the process of kicking the ball through. While it appears to be a referring error, there needto be 40/20 posts to determine more accurate kicks in general play.

Neil Meyers,Warners BayIS THAT the same Michael Cotts that worked at Big Harry’s Place? Good to see you haven’t changed, still a character.

Darren Duffy,Bobs FarmANDREW Whitbread-Brown (Short Takes 24/4):global coal production was7200m tonnes in 2016, double what it was 40 years previously. It is estimated that coal production will continue to increase out to 2040 at least. Coal is so this century.

Peter Devey,MerewetherANDREW Constance has ruined Newcastle for the people in the Hunter.We did not want to get off the train at Wickham, like the Maitland people and go a very short trip to Newcastle on a Bus. Can not put bikes and others on a bus or one day a light Rail. The people that have shops in Hunter Street are suffering. The money should have been spent on the beach wall at Stockton, Hospitals & Schools. He knows how to waste money.

George Tattersell,New LambtonFANCY putting a main road in the middle of an industrial centre. Munibung Road will be a black spot for accidents with all the trucks and couriers in and out of business driveways. Wake up to yourself, Lake Macquarie Council, before someone gets hurt.

Ross Jurd,EdgeworthTHE Greens want to drop the voting age to 16. The reason is simple enough: only people with undeveloped, juvenile brains vote green, a quick fix to the downturn of green support.

Steve Barnett,Fingal Bay

Comments Off on Angry Qld cop killed his baby with punch

Angry Qld cop killed his baby with punch

Angry Qld cop killed his baby with punch

A Supreme Court judge said Senior Constable Colin Randall killed his baby in a “horrendous attack”.Senior Constable Colin David Randall was so frustrated a work transfer was refused that when he was left alone with his baby son for the first time, he punched him to death.
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Then 37, he struck his 10-week-old baby Kye in the stomach with such force it “pulped” his liver, ruptured organs and bruised the boy’s lower back.

For three-and-a-half years after killing his son he lied to his wife, medical staff and investigators, but his ruse came undone when he pleaded guilty to manslaughter last Friday.

After Kye died in hospital in June 2014, Randall pretended it was due to injuries caused when he had incorrectly performed CPR.

His story was that he had put Kye in a swing and set about vacuuming his home, only to find him limp and unresponsive.

And for a while Randall’s wife Debbra Chambers believed him.

“For 18 solid months after Kye died, I was lied to, manipulated, deceived by the man who I was married to, believing Kye’s death was a tragic accident somehow and all his father did was try and save him,” she told Brisbane Supreme Court on Tuesday.

“I believed everything you said. I trusted you being my husband, my closest partner, the father of my children and a serving police officer.”

What really happened between Randall and Kye was revealed in court as preparations were made to sentence him for manslaughter, following the plea that came one week before he was due to face trial charged with murder.

Crown prosecutor Phil McCarthy said the day had started much the same as any other.

The usual routines were undertaken until Ms Chambers popped out to nearby shops.

She left Randall alone with their boy for the first time, unaware of how frustrated he had become.

The court heard Randall, a former science teacher, had been having an affair with a police administrative worker from Hervey Bay and was fixated on moving his family there.

After making arrangements to relocate, his plans were dashed when police knocked back his transfer request.

This led to an act of extreme violence, in which he lashed out and killed his son.

“It’s just an horrendous attack on a 10-week-old baby,” Justice Peter Davis said.

It left the boy with severe internal injuries, from which he never recovered.

“The child went into cardiac arrest because of the trauma,” Mr McCarthy said.

He was taken to hospital and for two-and-a-half hours unsuccessful attempts were made to resuscitate him.

Mr McCarthy told the court Randall should be given a sentence comparable to Heidi Strbak.

She was jailed five months ago for a minimum four years for killing her four-year-old son.

Randall remains suspended from the police force and is expected to be dismissed after being sentenced in the coming weeks.

Australian Associated Press

Comments Off on Bengalla and Mount Pleasant settle stoush

Bengalla and Mount Pleasant settle stoush

Bengalla and Mount Pleasant settle stoush

SPECIAL DELIVERY: Coal wagons being loaded for shipment to Newcastle before use by Aurizon to haul coal for mining company MACH EnergyNEIGHBOURING Hunter coal mines Bengalla and Mount Pleasant have ended a court dispute brought by Bengalla in April last year.
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Under the agreement, Mount Pleasant’s owner MACH Energy has agreed to remove infrastructure it had put up on land that Bengalla argued would hinder its future development.

MACH had disputed Bengalla’s assertion,but after settling their differences, MACH has until the end of October 2022 to pull down the disputed rail infrastructure and Bengalla will provide it with an alternative site.

Bengalla has also agreed to pay MACH $12 million in instalments.

The Mount Pleasant mine was proposed for many years by Coal & Allied, which sold it to MACH for $220 million in 2016.

MACH began building infrastructure soon after, and last month, theQueensland-based rail company Aurizon announced the arrival of 32 coal wagons in Newcastle it said weredestined for MACH Energy, as part of a larger consignment of 284 wagons.

“The new wagons will enter service for our newest customers, AGL Macquarie andMACHEnergy, demonstrating the strong growth we have seen in our New South Wales Coal haulage operations since we started in 2005,” Aurizon NSW manager Catherine Baxter said.

MACH energy criticised the Bengalla court action from the start, saying it was entitled to build the infrastructure where it had.

The Bengalla action was brought by shareholder New Hope Corporation, which said that under Mount Pleasant’s 1999 development approval, the mine owners were required toconsultwith Bengalla over access and coal-carrying infrastructure.

In a statement issued on Tuesday afternoon, the two parties said the proceedings wereto be discontinued, with each party bearing its own costs.

The statement said Bengalla wouldsupport the two applications lodged by MACH to modify the Mount Pleasant development consent, to extend the life of the Mount Pleasant Mine from 2020 to 2026 and to construct its long-term rail and associated infrastructure.

It said Bengalla would provide land to MACH to buildits long-term rail and associated infrastructure.

MACH had agreed to remove its existing, short-term rail and other infrastructure, which waslocated south of Wybong Road, Muswellbrook, by October 31, 2022, in order to make way for continuation of Bengalla’s mining operations south of Wybong Road.

MACH would transfer the contested land to Bengalla by the same date.

Bengalla would pay$12 million to MACH, by instalments.

“The relocation of MACH’s Infrastructure from Bengalla’s approved expansion area was always intended under each mine’s relevant approvals and will allow operations at both mines to continue unimpeded,” the joint statement said.

“The continued operation of both mines will generate significant employment opportunities and economic benefits for the local community and the state of NSW.”

Comments Off on Thousands flock to Melbourne Anzac service

Thousands flock to Melbourne Anzac service

Thousands flock to Melbourne Anzac service

Thosands, including children, are at Melbourne’s Shrine of Remembrance for the dawn service.Surgeon Annette Holian’s military battles involved scalpels, anaesthetic, blood and dressings.
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The Group Captain and first serving woman to address an Anzac Day dawn service in Melbourne told the tens of thousands packed around the Shrine of Remembrance about courage on the field.

“My medals represent personal hardship, specific challenges and many victories. Medical battles with scalpels, antiseptics, blood and dressing,” she said.

“They remind me of the emotion we faced living in the devastation in Aceh, its streets and rivers choked with the debris of thousands of bodies.”

An estimated 35,000 attended Wednesday’s service, which marks 100 years since the WWI battle of Villers-Bretonneux when Australian soldiers and their allies recaptured crucial territory from the Germans.

The numbers swelled by 10,000 from last year which organisers attributed to better weather and the ongoing commitment of Victorians to honouring service and sacrifice.

One former soldier at the service, Chris Walters, sees that day as more about his father and grandfather.

“I still never see today as respect to me. It’s more I still think of my grandfather (who) served. My dad was in the RAAF for 20 years,” he told AAP.

Mr Walters said the traditional minute’s silence during the service carried mixed emotions.

“I’ve lost friends and I know people who are struggling with things like PTSD and those that have returned.”

For years Vietnam veteran Sui Kamid wasn’t recognised for his service, but this has now changed.

“We never got any recognition for years and years, 20-odd years or so. So it was pretty hard to take in the beginning,” he said.

To reflect the changing face of Anzac Day, current veterans are due to lead the traditional Anzac march down St Kilda Road later on Wednesday.

“It is a decision … that we would turn the march on its head and have the younger veterans matching at the front,” Victorian RSL president Rob Webster told ABC TV.

Australian Associated Press

Comments Off on Australia’s southern-most dawn service an unforgettable experience

Australia’s southern-most dawn service an unforgettable experience

Australia’s southern-most dawn service an unforgettable experience

Australia’s southern-most dawn service an unforgettable experience Australian Antarctic expeditioners participating in dawn service at Casey research station. Picture: George Brettingham-Moore/Australian Antarctic Division
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Australian Antarctic expeditioners participating in dawn service at Casey research station. Picture: George Brettingham-Moore/Australian Antarctic Division

Commander Rebecca Jeffcoat, station leader, participating in dawn service at Casey research station. Picture: George Brettingham-Moore/Australian Antarctic Division

Australian Antarctic expeditioners participating in dawn service at Casey research station. Picture: George Brettingham-Moore/Australian Antarctic Division

Australian Antarctic expeditioners participating in dawn service at Casey research station. Picture: George Brettingham-Moore/Australian Antarctic Division

Australian Antarctic expeditioners participating in dawn service at Casey research station. Picture: George Brettingham-Moore/Australian Antarctic Division

Australian Antarctic expeditioners participating in dawn service at Casey research station. Picture: George Brettingham-Moore/Australian Antarctic Division

Commander Rebecca Jeffcoat, station leader, participating in dawn service at Casey research station. Picture: George Brettingham-Moore/Australian Antarctic Division

TweetFacebookTwenty-six Australians have paid their respects to those served at an Anzac Day they will never forget.

Just before dawn, the winter team at Casey research station in Antarctica, gathered at the station’s flagpole.

Defence Force Naval Officer veteranRebecca Jeffcoat led the ceremony.

Commander Jeffcoat is stationed in the Antarctica as Casey’s station leader, and has been a navy officer since 1990.

“I’ve been to many Anzac Day events over the years and today’s service, held against a backdrop of icebergs in Newcomb Bay, is one I will never forget,” Commander Jeffcoat said.

“We lowered the Australian flag to half-mast, listened to several readings and held the traditional two minutes of silence.

“The service was especially poignant as expeditioners took the opportunity to proudly share their family member’s service experience; in the Boer War, lost at sea in World War II and in Afghanistan.

“As we dig in for a long winter, we can imagine some of the challenges our defence men and women face when deployed to far-off and often hostile places, away from their families, in service of their country.”

A gun-fire breakfast warmed up the expeditioners, in the minus-15 degree temperatures.

They will continue the day with games of two-up, and watching a live broadcast of the Anzac Day AFL game.

The Examiner

Comments Off on 50 of the finest photos from Anzac Day 2018

50 of the finest photos from Anzac Day 2018

50 of the finest photos from Anzac Day 2018

50 of the finest photos from Anzac Day 2018 Multitudes turn out for the Kiama Anzac Day dawn service. Picture: Rebecca Boyd
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Shellharbour’s Anzac Day service on Wednesday. Photo: Sylvia Liber

Early morning, April 25 in Albury. Photo: James Wiltshire

Corporal Hayden Riley of the 219 cadets forms part of the catafalque party in Wagga. Picture: Les Smith

Australian Antarctic expeditioners participating in dawn service at Casey research station. Picture: George Brettingham-Moore/Australian Antarctic Division

Shellharbour’s Anzac Day service on Wednesday. Photo: Sylvia Liber

First light: About 1000 people gathered in Ulverstone for the dawn service. Pictures: Brodie Weeding

Salvation Army bugler Lindsay Stow plays the Last Post at the Warrnambool Dawn Service. Picture: Rob Gunstone

Anzac Day Dawn Service in Bendigo. Picture: Darren Howe

Early morning, April 25 in Albury. Photo: James Wiltshire

First light at Launceston’s Anzac Day dawn service. Photo: Scott Gelston

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach, Newcastle, 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach, Newcastle, 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Marieke Dam, Shay Stein, Julie Pettett, 2018 Anzac Day Horsham dawn service.

Wayne Wild, Maurie Anderson and Frank Logan at Ararat’s 2018 Anzac Day Dawn service on Wednesday. Photo: Peter Pickering

Wednesday morning’s poignant and touching commemoration at Orange’s Robertson Park Cenotaph. Photo: Jude Keogh

At the Tamworth dawn service. Photo: Gareth Gardner

Miranda Anzac Day dawn service. Photo: John Veage

Carly and Damien Batty with their daughter Eva, 4, at Wodonga RSL sub-branch after the dawn service. Picture: Mark Jesser

Ballarat dawn service. Photo: Lachlan Bence.

Wodonga Dawn Service. Photo: Mark Jesser

Wodonga Dawn Service. Photo: Mark Jesser

Tamworth’s main march. Photo: Northern Daily Leader

Inverell’s Anzac Day dawn service.

Dubbo commemorates the fallen.

The dawn service in Moree: Photo: Sophie Harris

Gathering in the early light at Jimboomba. Natalie Hall on Annie. Photo: Lisa Simmons

Trevor Lynch has chronicled the Nambucca Anzacs’ story. Photo: Mel Davies

Women leading the march at Bellingen after the service. Photo: Janene Carey

A scene from Penola’s Anzac Day ceremony.

Berrima Dawn Service was a family affair for Air Commodore Robert Rodgers. Photo: Madeline Crittenden

Members of the 3rd Light Horse Regiment Naracoorte Troop again added a poignant note to the Anzac Day ceremony in Naracoorte.

Mount Isa’s Anzac Day service 2018.

Shane Tobler and Archimedes from the Friends of the Wingecarribee Animal Shelter at the Berrima Dawn Service. Photo: Madeline Crittenden

From Mount Isa’s Anzac Day commemorations.

A scene from Dawesville, WA.

April Richardson from Hill Top Public School and Danielle Horne from Mittagong Public School at the Hill Top Dawn Service. Photo: Emily Bennett.

George Brown at Sebastopol’s Anzac Day service. Photo: Lachlane Bence.

Hundreds of people lined the streets of the Wollongong CBD to watch the 2018 Anzac Day parade.

Hundreds of people lined the streets of the Wollongong CBD to watch the 2018 Anzac Day parade.

Hundreds of people lined the streets of the Wollongong CBD to watch the 2018 Anzac Day parade.

Eaglehawk commemorates Anzac Day. Photo: Glenn Daniels

Eaglehawk commemorates Anzac Day. Photo: Glenn Daniels

Anzac day service at Canowindra. Photo: Rachael Webb

Newcastle march and service. Photo: Simone de Peak

Newcastle march and service. Photo: Simone de Peak

Newcastle march and service. Photo: Simone de Peak

Newcastle march and service. Photo: Simone de Peak

The serving officers march in Tamworth. Photo: Gareth Gardner

TweetFacebookThey lined the sides of roads, gathered atCenotaphs, memorials, and in town centres –men, women and children, all to pay their respects and remember those who have served and those we’ve lost.

Some were serving defence force personnel, others descendants of the fallen or those who’ve served, and others who just wanted to say thank you.

Anzac Day dawn services, marches and community events were held across the nation today as thousands of Australians gathered to commemorate the 103rd anniversary of the landing of Australian and New Zealand troops at Gallipoli.

Women took centre stage this year with their commitments to the armed forces recognised.

Above are some of the best photos from the services across the countrytoday–fromMount Isa to Launceston, Naracoorte to Antarctica!

Comments Off on F1 ace Ricciardo faces August deadline

F1 ace Ricciardo faces August deadline

F1 ace Ricciardo faces August deadline

Australian F1 ace Daniel Ricciardo has been given an August deadline to re-sign with Red Bull.Red Bull boss Christian Horner has given Australian F1 ace Daniel Ricciardo until August to re-sign or the team will begin looking elsewhere.
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The Red Bull boss’ demands follow revelations the 28-year-old has been in negotiations with Italian giants Ferrari.

Six-time Grand Prix winner Ricciardo has become the hottest free agent on the Formula One circuit following his victory in China 10 days ago.

“We do not want to wait forever. We have other good options,” Horner told German magazine Auto Motor Und Sport.

“There should be a decision by the summer (August) break at the latest.”

Horner said the team wants Ricciardo to stay at Red Bull but if it didn’t happen they would look at other options.

“Our priority is to continue working with Daniel. If that does not work, we’ll pull the other options,” Horner said.

“The most obvious is Carlos Sainz. He is under contract with us. And then there are a few young drivers,” he said.

Ricciardo is believed to have begun talks with Ferrari, with both parties locked into negotiations until June 30, according to Motorsport magazine.

Reigning champions Mercedes are also reportedly interested.

Ricciardo has previously said he does not want his next Formula One contract to tie him down.

Instead of the usual four-year-deal, Ricciardo said he wants a two-year contract due to the uncertainty over the sport’s future direction.

Formula One’s current engine regulations last only to the end of 2020, when team agreements also expire, and the sport is deciding how the future should look and what kind of engines will be used.

Ferrari have already warned that they could walk away if they do not like what is on offer.

“Each year something might change so I don’t want to tie myself down for four more years and then I’m like, ‘I don’t want to do this any more,” Ricciardo told The Times.

Meanwhile, Mercedes have yet to announce a new deal for four-times world champion Lewis Hamilton, who is also out of contract at the end of this season.

Australian Associated Press

Comments Off on Thousands stand solemn for Anzac Day dawn service in Newcastle

Thousands stand solemn for Anzac Day dawn service in Newcastle

Thousands stand solemn for Anzac Day dawn service in Newcastle

Thousands stand solemn for Anzac Day dawn service in Newcastle Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.
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Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

Anzac Day dawn service at Nobbys Beach Newcastle 2018. Picture: Simone De Peak.

TweetFacebookLast Postwas played by a bugler, the rain still drizzling and showing no sign of letting up.

But the solemn crowd was undeterred even though most were not carrying umbrellas.

Flashback:Remember Anzac Day in 2017

They jolted back again at the startling sound of cannon fire fromFortScratchley before acatafalque party concluded formal proceedings.

Mr Fayle became teary as he thanked the city for putting the Nobbys dawn service “on the map”.

The sub-branch president also announced he would be stepping down from his role as emcee to allow younger blood to come through.

“I could not be prouder of what you have done in this city,” he said.

“You have put us on the map. People outside [Newcastle] do not believe what you’ve done with your attendance and commitment.”

Official crowd figures were still being determined but Mr Fayle said it appeared to him the crowdwas on par with previous years (estimates typically place between 30,000 and 40,000 at the service).

Read more:Your complete guide to Anzac Day services in Newcastle and the Hunter

That is despite the inconvenience of road closures for the light rail project.

And security is tight with some city streets blocked off with garbage trucks and skip bins to guard against vehicle attacks.

Spectators were urged to use the park and ride bus service from McDonald Jones Stadium.

Thecrowd quickly dispersed from Nobbysas the rain became heavier.

The sunrise over Nobbys beach did not appear this dawn service because of cloud cover, but those who flocked to the beach still looked out over the ocean and reflected quietly among themselves.

Others made plans for coffee, and city centre cafes appeared to be doing a roaring trade.

Share your Anzac Day photos: send your photos to [email protected]南京夜网.au

Comments Off on Anzac Day 2018: Medowie dawn servicephotos, video

Anzac Day 2018: Medowie dawn servicephotos, video

Anzac Day 2018: Medowie dawn servicephotos, video

In a town of little more than 10,000 people, organisers of the Anzac Day dawn service at Medowie were very pleased with the turnout.
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“We had about 1000 people, and for a town this size it’s quite incredible,” Medowie RSL Sub Branch president Ian Harding said.

“Considering the weather we really appreciated it.”

Rain began to fall softly before dawn as the service personal, past and present, marched up Ferrodale Road to the memorial.

Anzac Day 2018: Medowie dawn service | photos, video LEST WE FORGET: Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Glenn Richards lays a wreath for the recently departed Robert Richards, RAAF. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Councillor Sarah Smith lays a wreath. Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Deputy mayor Chris Doohan lays a wreath. Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Di Funda of Newcastle Legacy lays a wreath. Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Port Stephens MP Kate Washington pays her respects. Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Medowie Women’s Auxiliary president Gretchie Sergeant lays a wreath. Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Deputy mayor Chris Doohan. Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: lan Fletcher and Stephen Withey from Military Working Dogs lay a wreath. Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Vietnam veteran Jim Batt lays a wreath. Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Glenn Richards, Christine Barrat and Donna Linsley lay wreaths in memory of Robert Richards. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Medowie RSL Sub Branch president Ian Harding and Chaplain David Deal. Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: Scenes from Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: The catafalque party. Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

LEST WE FORGET: The catafalque party. Anzac Day 2018 at Medowie. Picture: Sam Norris

TweetFacebookThis story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Comments Off on Crossbenchers have fresh look at tax cuts

Crossbenchers have fresh look at tax cuts

Crossbenchers have fresh look at tax cuts

Former Nick Xenophon Team Senator Rex Patrick will reconsider the coalition’s tax cuts.Former Nick Xenophon Team crossbenchers are giving the Turnbull government’s business tax cuts a “fresh look”, in encouraging signs for the coalition.
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Rex Patrick and Stirling Griff, of the now Centre Alliance, had originally opposed the package, but have since met with top officials, including Reserve Bank governor Philip Lowe and tax commissioner Chris Jordan.

“Part of the reason behind that (opposition) was we simply hadn’t had the opportunity to do due diligence on it. We now have got the opportunity to have a thorough look at it,” Senator Patrick told The Australian on Wednesday.

He said he agreed with Nick Xenophon’s decision to draw the line at supporting the relief for businesses with an annual turnover of up to $50 million.

But “my job is to take a fresh look at it”, Senator Patrick said.

The government has still failed to win over independent Tim Storer, while Derryn Hinch doesn’t want the big banks rewarded for their bad behaviour as outlined in the royal commission.

One Nation supports the tax cuts, but leader Pauline Hanson also wants the banks quarantined, with funds for their tax cut to go towards compensation for misconduct.

The government delayed putting its legislation to a vote in the upper house just before Easter, admitting it didn’t have the numbers.

Australian Associated Press

Comments Off on Canberra service reflects on sacrifice

Canberra service reflects on sacrifice

Canberra service reflects on sacrifice

Crowds are seen ahead of the dawn service at the National War Memorial in Canberra.A century of war has left behind severed limbs and broken bodies, and service men and women undamaged but changed.
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It’s a sight and a feeling veteran Army surgeon Colonel Susan Neuhaus knows all too well after serving in Afghanistan, Cambodia and Bouganville.

The first woman to deliver a commemorative address at the Canberra dawn service, she recalled her childhood experiences of the early morning Anzac Day commemoration.

As a girl she did not understand the silence “of half murmured hymns and of old men lost in their own thoughts”.

“And yet somehow those stories of service and sacrifice ground themselves into my DNA,” she said.

“Like most Australians today I have no faded photographs of men or women in uniform on my mantelpiece and don’t know of any family members who served on the beaches of Gallipoli, on the muddy fields of Somme or indeed the jungles of South East Asia.

“And yet like all of us I benefit from what they have done.”

Because of their sacrifices, those who are left to grow old do so in a peaceful country with the right to vote, marry who they please and hold the hope that future generations will have those freedoms too, she said.

Dignitaries at the Australian War Memorial included Acting Prime Minister Michael McCormack, Governor-General Sir Peter Cosgrove and Vice Chief of the Defence Force, Vice Admiral Ray Griggs.

But AWM director Brendan Nelson said the real special guests were the 38,000 everyday Australians who gathered under the stars waiting for dawn to break to remember the Anzacs and those who came after.

This year marks the 103rd anniversary of the landing at Gallipoli and the centenary of the Battle of Villers-Bretonneux.

Many among the crowds were there to remember someone special and honour those they served alongside.

Among them were hundreds of former Australian Army Apprentices.

More than 800 of them are expected to lead the march later in the morning as part of celebrations to mark 70 years since their formation.

Australian Associated Press

Comments Off on Queenslanders honoured at dawn service

Queenslanders honoured at dawn service

Queenslanders honoured at dawn service

Thousands gathered in the rain for the dawn service at Brisbane’s Anzac Square.Heavy clouds and heavy hearts.
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Dawn in Brisbane broke softly on Anzac Day morning as thousands of people gathered in drizzling rain to remember the fallen.

Armed with umbrellas and coffee, families, veterans and locals met in a darkened Anzac Square in the CBD to for the solemn service, which began at 4.28am.

The muffled sound of drums on Adelaide Street heralded the arrival of the Veterans Parade.

Children perched atop shoulders to watch wreaths being laid at the Shrine of Remembrance.

Heads bowed as the last post echoed into the gloom.

For first-time attendees Finn McNeil, 9, and his brother Rhys, 7, it was an opportunity to remember their great great uncle, Patrick Joseph Delacour.

At age 25, Private Delacour went to France with the 41st battalion in World War One.

He never returned.

Finn and Rhys’s parents Scott and Tracey said it was important that they teach their boys about the Anzac history.

“We wanted to show respect to the soldiers, the men and women, the nurses that served in World War One and World War Two to keep us safe,” Tracey told AAP.

“And all the animals,” Rhys added.

Debbie Radford, whose great uncle fought in World War Two, says attending the dawn service is a family tradition.

“We started attending the dawn services a number of years ago with our children and we were fortunate enough to go to Gallipoli in 2015 to go to the dawn service there. It was amazing what those young men went through,” she said.

“I think it’s part of our history, I think it’s something we need to keep telling our children and our grandchildren – it’s who we are, it’s part of us.”

Governor Paul de Jersey reminded the crowd, which filled the nearby streets and overpasses, of those Queenslanders “who sacrificed their tomorrows for our today”.

“This morning we remember the men of the Australian imperial force, crouched together in boats on the other side of the world, 103 years ago, awaiting their call to battle,” he said.

“Among those men were many Queenslanders of the brave 9th battalion, the first recruited in Queensland, among the first ashore that day, among the first to die.”

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk was also among the special guests to attend, laying a wreath at the Shrine of Remembrance.

Australian Associated Press

Comments Off on Cosby lawyers rebuked after ‘liar’ attack

Cosby lawyers rebuked after ‘liar’ attack

Cosby lawyers rebuked after ‘liar’ attack

Bill Cosby’s lawyers have called his accuser a liar in closing arguments at his sex assault trial.Defence lawyers for comedian Bill Cosby have attacked the credibility of women who testified against him at his sexual assault trial, drawing a stern rebuke from prosecutors who said such shaming of victims was the reason women do not report sex crimes.
Nanjing Night Net

Cosby, the once-beloved comedian and TV dad, is on trial on three counts of aggravated indecent assault of Andrea Constand, 45, at his home outside Philadelphia in January 2004.

Lawyers for each side made their closing arguments on Tuesday at Montgomery County Courthouse in Norristown, Pennsylvania.

Defence lawyer Thomas Mesereau picked apart what he called inconsistent statements by Constand, labelling her “a pathological liar” and reminding the jury she continued to call Cosby after the alleged assault. He declared Cosby “must be acquitted on all counts.”

Co-counsel Kathleen Bliss then assailed the five other witnesses who said they, like Constand, had been drugged and violated by Cosby, saying it was unfair to Cosby that they were “digging up stuff from three decades ago.”

She said Cosby’s accusers were fabricating stories in search of money and fame that would come with levelling such allegations against Cosby, a comedian known for clean material and whose television career was based on a wholesome image.

“What is this case about? Money, press conferences, TV shows, salacious coverage, ratings. Sex sells,” Bliss said.

When the prosecution got its turn, Assistant District Attorney Kristen Feden turned her attention not just to Cosby but also to Bliss, calling her attack on the accusers “shameful, utterly shameful.”

“She (Bliss) is the exact reason women and men don’t report these crimes. Victims of sexual assault are part of society, too. They have families; they are human beings,” Feden said.

In all, some 50 women have accused Cosby of sexual assault going back decades, though only Constand’s case was recent enough for criminal prosecution.

This is his second trial, after a deadlocked jury in the first trial failed to reach a verdict last year, just before a flood of sexual assault and harassment accusations against rich and powerful men gave rise to the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements.

As in the first trial, Cosby declined to testify on his own behalf. He has denied wrongdoing, saying any sexual contact he had was consensual.

His wife of more than 50 years, Camille Cosby, arrived in court on Tuesday for the first time since the trial began on April 9.

Australian Associated Press